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Jan 17
Friday
Arts and Poetry
Into Empty Space

Joy: mixed media on rice paper, mounted on canvas. 15 by 12 inches.

Joy: mixed media on rice paper, mounted on canvas. 15 by 12 inches.

Art that Reflects Feelings and Perceptions
by Yeachin Tsai, Troy, NY

Growing up in Taiwan, I was deeply influenced by traditional Chinese brush painting and calligraphy. I began to experiment with materials that partly characterize modern Western painting after I moved to New York City. I now utilize mostly rice paper and silk fabric. The absorbent and textural qualities of these materials differ from those of canvas. When further into the process, I mount the work on substrates more common to Western painting.

My artwork includes painting and calligraphy. When executing the brush strokes and marks, I am particularly mindful and aware of the spaces in between. The empty space becomes a crucial component of the painting itself.

The Heart of Compassion: sumi ink on rice paper, mounted on paper. 12 by 15 inches.

The Heart of Compassion: sumi ink on rice paper, mounted on paper. 12 by 15 inches.

The painting subjects and styles I choose are abstract because I have always been intrigued by pattern and colors. My interest may have started when I was four years old. I remember seeing the floating, shining dust particles reflecting the sunlight in the stale attic air of my family’s old house. The magic quality of nowness left an unspeakable feeling in my mind.

Chinese is mainly a pictorial language. As an artist with deep training in Chinese calligraphy, painting, and literature, the sounds, forms, and layouts of Chinese symbols have always amazed me. Each symbol has a vibrant life. The classical Chinese expression that “calligraphy and painting are from the same origin,” indicates that there is an intimate relationship between these two expressive forms. For example, the Chinese character “heart” is literally a drawing of the shape of heart. “Sun” and “moon” are depicted as they appear in nature. “Water” and “fire” were shaped to express their respective qualities. The beautiful art form is alive with the space and energy of the brushstrokes, imbued with the spirit of the writer.

I use the materials to reflect the feelings and perceptions I have experienced in life. The impressions that come through relating to nature, people, and the essence of being – the ever changing, flowing energy in the world of the fleeting moments. This is nowness.

Iridescent Bubble: mixed media on rice paper, mounted on paper. 22 by 15 inches.

Iridescent Bubble: mixed media on rice paper, mounted on paper. 22 by 15 inches.

Chaos is Good News: mixed media on rice paper, mounted on canvas. 26 by 30 inches.

Chaos is Good News: mixed media on rice paper, mounted on canvas. 26 by 30 inches.


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For more of Yeachin’s work, please see: www.yeachin.net

Yeachin TsaiYeachin Tsai was born in Taipei, Taiwan. She is an artist, writer, Chinese interpreter/translator, and Shambhala Buddhist. She has translated a few Shambhala Buddhism and Zen books into the Chinese language, including the translation of the Sakyong’s “Ruling Your World”, “Running with the Mind of Meditation”, and his newest book “The Shambhala Principle” (in process). She edited the Chinese edition of the Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche’s “Turning the Mind into an Ally”, Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche’s “Shambhala: Sacred Path of the Warrior”, “Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism”, Lady Diana J. Mukop’s “Dragon Thunder – My life with Chogyam Trungpa”, and “Blazing Splendor: The Memoirs of Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche.” Yeachin is also the chief editor of “The Enlightened World of Shambhala,” the Chinese Newsletter online blog for Chinese readers; and “Everyday Ink,” an online artwork showcase blog with images, prose, and poetry. She lives and works in New York State with her beloved husband Jeff Wigman.

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5 responses to “ Into Empty Space ”
  1. Love that one called Joy…but others too. I was also captivated by the dust motes (particles). It’s funny how we remember that. Maybe because they were things floating in the air with no rhyme or reason. I can still see where I was the first time I spaced out on them…in my grandmother’s bedroom sitting upon her bed and looking at the light from the window with those motes. Thanks for the memory. Try and get to that INK ART show at the MET…you’ll love it. xxPH

  2. These are so beautiful! I would love to see more of your work, where would that be?

  3. Mary Bryan Brooks
    Jan 25, 2014
    Reply

    Thank you for sharing your work – it is truly wonderful.
    I go to Taipei 2 months a year, spring and fall. It would be great to meet you if our trips happened to overlap.
    Also, the Taipei Shambhala group is always very eager for any teachings/discussion – especially in Mandarin.
    Best, Mary (in Boulder, CO)

  4. Dear Mary:
    It would be so nice if you can contact the Taipei Shambhala Group coordinator when you are in Taiwan to arrange. Her name is Grace Chang (Wen-Shing Grace Chang):
    grace20020826@yahoo.com.tw
    Thank you for your kindness.
    Warm Regards,
    Yeachin

  5. Dear Margaret:
    Glad you like my work. To see more of my artwork, please see: http://www.yeachin.net
    and, http://www.everydayink.com
    Thanks!
    Warmly, Yeachin


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